WEIRD ANOMALY ON SATURN





  • @KUSTEVE

    Since there are no Russians, or Chinese, on Saturn to justify sending robots there, sound military strategy dictates sewing the possibility of aliens there to rationalize the enterprise.

    The longer this misaccounted for $20-30 Trillion at the Pentagon hangs out there, the more alien legends we are apt to see floated to predictive program its eventual explanation.

    Going to protect us from aliens since 1998 with secret expenditures of, oh, say, $20 Trillion could be a great explanation of where the money went. They had to develop space travel and robotics technology to save us from a possible alien threat. Capice?

    And besides, sooner or later, the Pentagon does need to send robots and weapons to stake out control of the water on one of the Saturnian moons. If I recall correctly, a moon on Saturn (or is it Jupiter?) has the largest known liquid state oceans under an ice cap in the solar system other than earth. There’s apparently quite a bit of ice here and there in the solar system, but liquid water, in vast quanties, separated only by a thin ice cap, is apparently scarce. Think of it like oil on earth. Oil is ubiquitous on earth. But low sulfur oil in vast quantities at a controllable location near the ocean suitable for low cost refinement and transshipment is relatively rare. So: you grab it when you can. Same with water in our solar system.

    Space travel and robotics technologies are proliferating rapidly among Pentagon competitors, like the Shanghai Security Pact countries, plus Japan and the Euro Space Agency. It apparently makes sense to grab that water now with a robotized military force structure. The water and it’s salt will likely be indispensable for any long term robotized industrial activity in space down the road.



  • @jaybate-1.0 There have been a number of sci-fi stories in that vein. One, as I recall (alas, no names ot titles come to mind–lots of modern pulp reading has flooded my memory banks), if not more, was about some private space-mining company getting an exclusive drilling contract that unexpectedly discovered liquid water in an asteroid (this was before the discovery you highlighted). The company used the power of having the only extra-Terran water (i.e., not requiring boosting out of Earth gravity) to leverage itself into a massive superpower controlling virtually all interplanetary travel and, eventually, interstellar travel and control of newly discovered alien technology.

    Most sci-fi, of course, just assumes we will harness ridiculous amounts of energy from Scotty’s dilithium crystals, or whatnot, and from there processing H and O into water in space would be easy.



  • @mayjay

    Military strategists have a rich, varied and occasionally bloody terrestrial history of trying to grab strategically expedient water resources. It’s hard to forget this once I saw the Pont du Gard aqueduct.

    Nothing conspiratorial or Sci-fi fantasy here.

    In fact, it would appear quite a historical anomaly were TPTB today to refrain from their predecessors 2000 year old water habit, I am sure you would agree.

    And that misaccounted for $20-30 Trillion needs to be explained SOME HOW. RIGHT? 😀

    I’m not kvetching, or complaining, here. The national debt run up by the private central bank owners is already far beyond US tax payers apparent capacity to service. The Fed apparently e-prints the debt notes out of phase space in split seconds. I can’t think of a better use/abuse of the fiat e-debt capability than cornering the solar system’s handiest water supply for the modest initial cost of some robots and lasers and a few nukes zoomed up to a Saturnian moon by Space X that would likely handily plug and play on the Deep Space network NASA says its been building in earnest the last 10 years or so.

    IMHO, science fiction has all been such a silly distraction, even it’s been for predictive programming uses. It keeps many of us from getting on with the straight forward business plan of development and management. I seriously doubt The Office of Net Assesment relies on Sci-fi to decide how to manage the strategic aspects of the solar system, do you?.

    There are NO conspiracies of major significance in my opinion regarding management of the solar system. Our Pentagon and our bureaucracies would squish them like bugs over time.

    The future is ALWAYS now!!

    What happens is what has long been instituted to happen coupled with some faster (or slower) than expected and a few unexpected techno advances.

    I don’t see why folks waste time with sci-fi, conspiracies and conspiracy theories, when the important, decisive stuff is all duly instituted and sooner or later quite out in the open, do you?

    Why don’t people just read the National Security Act of 1947 and stop making up silly conspiracy theories, or echoing those made up by Intel, about how USA operates? I just don’t get it.

    Conspiracy theories, especially those reputedly packaged as big budget movies, appear so largely irrelevant to what happens.

    I don’t understand the fascination with sci-fi and conspiracy theories beyond their artistic aesthetic merits. Once you learn their authors, like Art Clarke, had Intel connections, well, who can take them seriously, right?

    Reality, when you can clear away some of the disinfo used to obscure some small part of it, is so much more interesting than all this made up rubbish by Intel plants in media and victims half frightened out of their wits by what have you, don’t you agree?

    Ah, but I’m preaching to the choir here, aren’t I?

    Robots are real. Bill Gates and Warren Buffett and so on say so. I’ve seen them weld car parts for decades now. And Gates and Buffett have no reason to lie…about robots.

    The Deep Space network is real. NASA has no reason to lie about it that I can discern.

    The handy water under the ice on the Saturnian moon is real. Lots of space scientists have no reason to make it up. It really would be useful in industrial uses of space.

    Safely storing defense and financial and infrastructure data and mounting weapons beyond the reach of your terrestrial enemies do likely counter abilities to erase same on earth with EM PULSING and/or explosive destruction. Such data redundancy in Deep space is a real benefit NOW!

    Robotic space flight in the solar system is real and feasible now, unlike human space flight, which might never be.

    The water resources on the Saturnian moon and the need to control them from terrestrial competitors like Russia, China, Japan, UK, Germany, with emerging space and robotics capabilies; that’s only logical AND common sense.

    No need for sci-fi to explain this.



  • All I know is there is an 180 mile long funnel that is turning at 200 mph. Now that is one hell of a wind tunnel, folks.



  • KUSTEVE said:

    All I know is there is an 180 mile long funnel that is turning at 200 mph. Now that is one hell of a wind tunnel, folks.

    ——————

    Thank heavens it’s not a monolith. Getting hit in the head by a monolith at 200 mph would hurt!!!

    Let’s mount an international effort like in 2001: Space Odyssey, and go investigate it now. I bet $20-30 Trillion would cover it!

    😀



  • @jaybate-1.0 Can’t do 2001 again. No one listens to waltz music in movies anymore.



  • @jaybate-1.0 And Deep Space is real. I saw the Ferengi making all types of scams up there. Odo and Jax couldn’t do a thing, and they drove Sisko right out of space.



  • mayjay said:

    @jaybate-1.0 Can’t do 2001 again. No one listens to waltz music in movies anymore.

    ————————

    That’s what they told Stan before they gave him the dark circles around the eyes. He went ahead and used Strauss anyway!!

    Waltz rocks!



  • mayjay said:

    @jaybate-1.0 And Deep Space is real. I saw the Ferengi making all types of scams up there. Odo and Jax couldn’t do a thing, and they drove Sisko right out of space.

    ———————-

    I am going to miss the apparent secret space fleet legend, when it is let go like an unsuccessful KU football coach, aren’t you?



  • Didn’t the government just announce a fifth branch of the military, the space force? Or did I dream that?



  • @dylans

    You’re not dreaming. I recall it to. Or else we are both streaming. Or this is a simulation. 😀



  • @dylans space jams



  • @KUSTEVE Are the diamond rains extra blingy during hexagonal polar vortexes? https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-24477667





  • @approxinfinity Make sure to bring your bucket, and scoop em up.



  • jaybate 1.0 said:

    @mayjay

    Military strategists have a rich, varied and occasionally bloody terrestrial history of trying to grab strategically expedient water resources. It’s hard to forget this once I saw the Pont du Gard aqueduct.

    Nothing conspiratorial or Sci-fi fantasy here.

    In fact, it would appear quite a historical anomaly were TPTB today to refrain from their predecessors 2000 year old water habit, I am sure you would agree.

    And that misaccounted for $20-30 Trillion needs to be explained SOME HOW. RIGHT? 😀

    As long as we are talking science fiction, can you please cite where you get that 20-30 trillion unaccounted funds by the Pentagon figure? 6.5 trillion seems to the accepted number.

    Why would we go to a planet that is 1 billion miles away (7 years of travel) and is deemed to be completely inhospitable to humans to get water? Does not seem like an strategically expedient water resource.

    Maybe we should explore getting water from Uranus instead? :smile:





  • KUSTEVE said:

    @JayHawkFanToo https://www.forbes.com/sites/kotlikoff/2017/12/08/has-our-government-spent-21-trillion-of-our-money-without-telling-us/#346e98e07aef

    First paragraph below header…

    The report indicates that for fiscal year 2015 the Army failed to provide adequate support for $6.5 trillion in journal voucher adjustments.

    So, only 6.5 trillion are not properly documented.



  • @JayHawkFanToo and if you keep reading:

    While the documents are incomplete, original government sources indicate $21 trillion in unsupported adjustments have been reported for the Department of Defense and the Department of Housing and Urban Development for the years 1998-2015.



  • @dylans

    I was referring to the Department of Defense only.



  • @JayHawkFanToo I would think if there is $6.5 trillion missing from one year, there is more.



  • @dylans

    Those numbers are very misleading. The entire Department of Defense budget is around 600 billion so the 6.5 trillion figure does not seem right. If you scroll down it indicates that the mentioned figure for the Department of Defense and Housing and Urban Development are from 1998 to 2015. To put it in perspective, the entire Federal Budget is just over 4 trillion.



  • I wonder if the higher numbers come from adjustments being made in several departments of DOD, and represent just the cumulative amount, not the net.

    Say, if, for example, Army Aviation has a budgeted item of 6 million for a new helicopter electronics weapon software upgrades. The money perhaps should have been budgeted to Army Technological Services, so they transfer the money. Ledger shows 6 mil going to AA, another entry shows 6 mil deleted from AA, and the ledger for ATS shows influx of 6 million. Altogether, 18 million is appearing somewhere of which only 6 million is budgeted money actually spent and 12 million is adjustments. If there were transfers of funds numerous other times for accounting purposes, the same money could look like many multiples.

    Good accounting practices would prevent this from being reported in net reports, but these are apparently just totals of ledger entries with no indication whether they were cross-checked.



  • @mayjay Here is another example of how “totals” don’t reflect net financial change:

    I have a blackjack game on my computer (not a real gambling app, just a game). Last night, starting with $5,000, I played 58 hands, increasing my bets when I got ahead, before a few “all or nothing” bets broke me. The stats at the end showed total winnings of $363,465, but the highest I ever got was 32 grand. My net loss from the beginning was $5,000. My net loss from my highest was $32,000. My total losses probably equaled my winnings plus my initial 5, for $368K. If you wanted to know how much money the “house” and I together accounted for in some fashion during the session, it would be either the 363K plus the 368K (731K), or double that if you were looking at 4 separate ledgers. Over a million out of a net transaction of 5 grand.



  • Graft in the Defense Department? Oh My Goodness 😲…tell me it ain’t so, Joe.


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